When does a pear tree bloom?

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The pear tree is in bloom in September for the 2nd time this year

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Moderators:LCV, stefan, tormi

jef1
Posts: 5
Registered: Mon 14 Sep 2015 7:38 pm

The pear tree is in bloom in September for the 2nd time this year

Contribution from jef1 »

My young pear tree is already in bloom for the 2nd time this year, so now again in September, to my surprise.
It was planted together with a second tree about 3 years ago and is still quite tender.
The other one has no flowers and no other fruit or deciduous tree is in bloom with me.

For me a miracle of nature. Or maybe just explainable?

Due to the heat and drought, nature is now really blossoming from my observation. But that?

Would be grateful for in-depth information about my phenomenon.

LCV
Posts: 9313
Registered: Mon 03 Dec 2007 1:46 p.m.
Place of residence: 79379 Muellheim

Contribution from LCV »

Hello,

the 2nd time referring to the fact that it also bloomed in September last year? Didn't it flower in the spring? Is it a completely normal Pyrus communis or some sort or something exotic?

I haven't seen this with pear yet, but there are some examples like the Magnolia x soulangeana. It bloomed 20 years ago in the spring and that was it. Then came a second flowering period in summer, not as abundant as the first, but at least. For the last 2 years there have been a few more flowers in October, i.e. 3rd flowering. That has to do with the climate, which is even warmer in our region than in the rest of Germany.

There is another cause with the horse chestnuts. Since the chestnut miner moths the leaves turning brown too early, the tree seems to react and blooms again in the middle of autumn.

That doesn't explain the phenomenon with your pear tree, but the experts can certainly do something with some additional information. It would also be important to know in which region the tree is located.

Greetings Frank

Stefan
Moderator
Posts: 6149
Registered: Sun 08 Oct 2006 17:44
Place of residence: Lower Rhine

Contribution from Stefan »

Hello jef1,

after the spring bloom, many plants begin to bloom in the buds (for the next year) sometime in the course of the summer.
This is especially true for fruit trees, but also for many others.
A very dry summer can lead to a period of dormancy for many plants - like a cold winter (which is dry for plants when the ground is frozen!).
When it gets damp at the end of summer, for some plants this is actually a new beginning of vegetation - like in spring! - and buds may begin to sprout.
Individual flowers can then open.
The tendency to do this is different depending on the species and variety; your pear tree may also be one that is particularly prone to it.
Greetings, Stefan

AndreasG.
Posts: 2774
Registered: Sun Jun 10, 2007 12:08 pm
Place of residence: Vogtland

Contribution from AndreasG. »

Did it develop fruits after the first bloom?

Cryptomeria
Posts: 9602
Registered: Thursday May 25, 2006 7:45 p.m.
Place of residence: Fraulund / 24405 Rügge

Contribution from Cryptomeria »

There is nothing more to add to Stefan's remarks, only that the same applies to many trees (e.g. magnolias, etc.) and perennials (e.g. foxgloves, etc.).

VG Wolfgang
Anyone who plants trees and knows that they will never sit in their shade has begun to understand the meaning of life.

jef1
Posts: 5
Registered: Mon 14 Sep 2015 7:38 pm

Contribution from jef1 »

Thanks Frank for the 1st AW for me on this forum. I was also really happy about the others.

Regarding your question, which I thought I had made clear through my formulation (or not after all):
The pear tree, like all my other fruit trees, blooms annually in spring. This year the 1st x that I see a pear tree blooming in September in addition to spring. And just as intensely as in spring.

Williams variety. bought from Hofer (Aldi) and is located in the Danube valley approx. 60 km east of Vienna in a wine-growing region.

Because of another contribution I have to confess that the fruit sets have already fallen off very small with a maximum of 2 cm dm (hail, birds or ???).

lg

jef

jef1
Posts: 5
Registered: Mon 14 Sep 2015 7:38 pm

Contribution from jef1 »

Hello Stefan,

thank you for your AW. I thought so too. However, I have not yet discovered this in any fruit tree on my own or anywhere else. My variety is a Williams, bought from Hofer and is in the Danube valley 60 km west of Vienna. My conference doesn't do anything.

Because of the contribution from AndreasG. I have to admit that the fruit sets have fallen off very small with a maximum of 2 cm dm (hail, birds or ???). The same, however, also with the Conference pear and my creeping trees without these showing again flowers.

lg

jef

jef1
Posts: 5
Registered: Mon 14 Sep 2015 7:38 pm

Contribution from jef1 »

Thanks for your question AndreasG ..

Perhaps you have already read the AW in response to your question in my AW.

So he has lost the fruit set with a maximum of 2 cm dm. Do I understand the background of your question correctly, that you mean he still had (too) much energy for it? That's right, but as I said, the Conference pear, Kriecherl, etc. were equally affected.

jef1
Posts: 5
Registered: Mon 14 Sep 2015 7:38 pm

Contribution from jef1 »

Hello and thank you Cryptomeria / Wolfgang.

Well 2015 was a special year in terms of weather. With us a lot of drought almost all year round, then the heat and hailstorms at the beginning of May.

I am aware of the wonderful nature and I did not rule this out for other plant species. Only with fruit trees and especially pears have I never seen it. Not even with my other pear tree of the same age (Conference instead of the now blooming Williams) or other types of fruit such as B. crawls or apples.

AndreasG.
Posts: 2774
Registered: Sun Jun 10, 2007 12:08 pm
Place of residence: Vogtland

Contribution from AndreasG. »

It is not uncommon for a fruit tree to partially shed its fruit. But if they are completely thrown off, the tree suffers from stress.
You already mentioned the drought yourself.

In the case of planted trees, it is expected that watering will have to take place up to two, sometimes even up to three years after planting, especially if the drought is long. Only then are the trees sufficiently rooted to be able to take care of themselves.

Reindl86
Posts: 172
Registered: Mon 09 Jun 2014 11:48 am

Contribution from Reindl86 »

jef1 wrote:Hello and thank you Cryptomeria / Wolfgang.

Well 2015 was a special year in terms of weather. With us a lot of drought almost all year round, then the heat and hailstorms at the beginning of May.

I am aware of the wonderful nature and I did not rule this out for other plant species. Only with fruit trees and especially pears have I never seen it before. Not even with my other pear tree of the same age (Conference instead of the now blooming Williams) or other of my types of fruit such as. B. crawls or apples.
Hello,

Last week I saw the same "phenomenon" in Graz with horse chestnut trees and thought I couldn't believe my eyes.

Somehow this must really have something to do with the weather this year.

A field maple bonsai has also turned completely brown with my foliage. Suddenly in August he drove all over again ...

Lg

LCV
Posts: 9313
Registered: Mon 03 Dec 2007 1:46 p.m.
Place of residence: 79379 Muellheim

Contribution from LCV »

Hello Reindl,

see my post above. Was the chestnut infested with the chestnut leaf miner? We discussed this second blossom in autumn a few years ago and came to the conclusion that the tree reacts to this attack with another blossom in autumn.

Greetings Frank

Reindl86
Posts: 172
Registered: Mon 09 Jun 2014 11:48 am

Contribution from Reindl86 »

LCV wrote:Hello Reindl,

see my post above. Was the chestnut infested with the chestnut leaf miner? We discussed this second blossom in autumn a few years ago and came to the conclusion that the tree reacts to this attack with another blossom in autumn.

Greetings Frank
Oh, I guess I didn't see that. In retrospect, I probably won't be able to tell if there was a moth on it, right?

The chestnuts are in a public square, but are rather "younger".

In the immediate vicinity of us there are old "calibres" (certainly at least ~ 200 years old), which have never blossomed.

LCV
Posts: 9313
Registered: Mon 03 Dec 2007 1:46 p.m.
Place of residence: 79379 Muellheim

Contribution from LCV »

When this moth attacks horse chestnuts, the leaves become prematurely withered and rusty brown. This is why many chestnuts have looked so sick since this pest was introduced here.

AndreasG.
Posts: 2774
Registered: Sun Jun 10, 2007 12:08 pm
Place of residence: Vogtland

Contribution from AndreasG. »

LCV wrote: This is why many chestnuts have looked so sick since this pest was introduced here.
I think they spread by themselves, without human intervention.
Didn't we even have the subject a few years ago of how the native nature in the form of blue tits gradually adapts to these critters?
Can't find the post right now.
But chestnuts and moths have coexisted for a while in their homeland.